Long Range Navigation

Long Range Navigation

Complete the entire assignment on a Word document. Turn it in via the dropbox on HTMLeZ. Use the following format for both your title and file name: lastname_firstname_tp1_2 (failure to use this format will result in a point penalty). This project is due no later than the start of class on Thursday, June 19, 2003.

1.Select a country outside North America that begins with the same letter as your last name. If you are unable to find a country starting with the same letter as your last name, then use the next letter in the alphabet. BAHAMAS

1.Are landing rights granted? If so, what are the requirements? What are the limitations?

a. Private aircraft over flying or landing for noncommercial purposes need not obtain prior permission; however, prior notification is required to the airport of arrival and a flight plan must be on file. Permission must be obtained from the Ministry of Transport for obtaining over flight and landing rights for non-scheduled commercial aircraft.

b. Nonscheduled commercial aircraft landing for commercial purposes must obtain prior permission from the Secretary, Air Transport Licensing Authority, P. O. Box N975, Nassau N.P., Bahamas (TELEGRAPHIC ADDRESS: CADAIR BAHAMAS/TELEX: NONE) prior to departure in addition to having a flight plan on file.

2.Is over flight allowed? If so, what are the requirements? What are the limitations?

– a. Private aircraft over flying or landing for noncommercial purposes need not obtain prior permission; however, prior notification is required to the airport of arrival and a flight plan must be on file. Permission must be obtained from the Ministry of Transport for obtaining over flight and landing rights for non-scheduled commercial aircraft.

3.If neither of the above is allowed, briefly discuss the reasons why you think these restrictions are in place.

-THERE ARE LANDING RIGHTS AND OVERFLIGHT PERMISSION WITH PRIOR NOTIFACATATION

4.What are your personal entry requirements for this country?

– ENTRY AND EXIT REQUIREMENTS: U.S. citizens must present original proof of U.S. citizenship (a valid passport, a certified U.S. birth certificate, or a Certificate of Naturalization), in addition to photo identification and an onward/return ticket for entry into The Bahamas. Voter registration cards, Social Security cards, driver’s licenses, affidavits, and other similar documents are not acceptable as proof of U.S. citizenship. Visas are not required for U.S. citizens for stays up to eight months. There is an airport departure tax for travelers age six years and older.

In an effort to prevent international child abduction, many governments have initiated procedures at entry/exit points. These often include requiring documentary evidence of relationship and permission for the child’s travel from the parent(s) or legal guardian not traveling with the child. Having such documentation on hand, even if not required, may facilitate entry and departure.

For further information, U.S. citizens may contact the Embassy of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, 2200 Massachusetts Avenue N.W., Washington D.C. 20008, telephone (202) 319-2660, or the Bahamian consulates in Miami or New York. Additional information is available on The Bahamas Tourist Board web site at http://www.bahamas.com or at telephone 1-800-422-4262, and on the official web site of the Government of The Bahamas at http://www.bahamas.gov.bs/.

MEDICAL INSURANCE: U.S. medical insurance is not always valid outside the United States. U.S. Medicare and Medicaid programs do not provide payment for medical services outside the United States. Uninsured travelers who require medical care overseas may face extreme difficulties. Please check with your own insurance company to confirm whether your policy applies abroad. Please ascertain whether payment will be made to the overseas hospital or doctor or if you will be reimbursed later for the expenses that you incur. Some insurance policies also include coverage for psychiatric treatment and for disposition of remains in the event of death. Useful information on medical emergencies abroad, including overseas insurance programs, is provided in the Department of State’s Bureau of Consular Affairs brochure, Medical Information for Americans Traveling Abroad, available via the Bureau of Consular Affairs home page or autofax: (202)647-3000.

REGISTRATION/EMBASSY AND CONSULATE LOCATIONS: Americans living in or visiting The Bahamas are encouraged to register at the Consular Section of the U.S. Embassy in Nassau and obtain updated information on travel and security within The Bahamas. The U.S. Embassy is located next to McDonald’s restaurant on Queen Street in downtown Nassau; telephone (242)322-1181, after hours: (242)328-2206. The Consular Section hours are 9:00 a.m. – 12:00 noon and 2:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. Monday-Friday, except local and U.S. holidays. The U.S. Embassy is also responsible for consular services in the Turks and Caicos Islands (TCI), a United Kingdom (British) overseas territory. U.S. citizens may obtain updated information on travel and security in TCI from the U.S. Embassy in Nassau.

5.Who would you call, and what phone number would you use, should you need United States government assistance while in this country?

Consular Section of the U.S. Embassy in Nassau and obtain updated information on travel and security within The Bahamas. The U.S. Embassy is located next to McDonald’s restaurant on Queen Street in downtown Nassau; telephone (242)322-1181, after hours: (242)328-2206. The Consular Section hours are 9:00 a.m. – 12:00 noon and 2:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. Monday-Friday, except local and U.S. holidays. The U.S. Embassy is also responsible for consular services in the Turks and Caicos Islands (TCI), a United Kingdom (British) overseas territory. U.S. citizens may obtain updated information on travel and security in TCI from the U.S. Embassy in Nassau.

6.What is the population of this country? What is the ethnic composition of this country?

Area: 13,939 sq. km. (5,382 sq. mi.); slightly larger than Connecticut and Rhode Island combined.

Cities: Capital–Nassau, New Providence. Second-largest city–Freeport, Grand Bahama.

Nationality: Noun and adjective–Bahamian(s).

Ethnic groups: African 85%, European 12%, Asian and Hispanic 3%.

Religions: Baptist predominant (32%), Roman Catholic, Anglican, Evangelical Protestants, Methodist, Church of God.

Language: English; some Creole among Haitian groups.

Education: Years compulsory–through age 16. Attendance–95%. Literacy–93%.

Health (2000): Infant mortality rate–17.0/1,000. Life expectancy–73.9 years.

Work force (2000): 157,640; majority employed in the tourism, government, and financial services sectors.

Eighty-five percent of the Bahamian population is of African heritage. About two-thirds of the population resides on New Providence Island (the location of Nassau). Many ancestors arrived in the Bahama Islands when they served as a staging area for the slave trade in the early 1800s. Others accompanied thousands of British loyalists who fled the American colonies during the Revolutionary War.

School attendance is compulsory between the ages of 5 and 16. The government fully operates 158 of the 210 primary and secondary schools in The Bahamas. The other 52 schools are privately operated. Enrollment for state and private primary and secondary schools amounts to more than 66,000 students. The College of The Bahamas, established in Nassau in 1974, provides programs leading to bachelors and associates degrees. The college is now converting from a 2- to a 4-year institution. Several non-Bahamian colleges also offer higher education programs in The Bahamas.

7.Briefly discuss the political climate of this country.

Type: Constitutional parliamentary democracy. Independence: July 10, 1973.

Branches: Executive–British monarch (nominal head of state), governor general (representative of the British monarch), prime minister (head of government), and cabinet. Legislative–bicameral Parliament (40-member elected House of Assembly, 16-member appointed Senate). Judicial–Privy Council in U.K., Court of Appeal, Supreme Court, and magistrates’ courts.

Political parties: Free National Movement (FNM), Progressive Liberal Party (PLP), and Coalition for Democratic Reform (CDR).

Suffrage (2000): Universal over 18; 140,000 registered voters.

8.Do you expect or anticipate any possible personal safety concerns, such as potential criminal or violent activity? If so, what safety measures would you be taking?

CRIME INFORMATION: Visitors should exercise caution and good judgment when visiting The Bahamas. Violent crime has increased in the recent past, and the American Embassy has received several reports of sexual assaults on American tourists, including teen-age girls. While most criminal incidents take place in a part of Nassau not usually frequented by tourists (the “over-the-hill” area south of downtown), crime and violence has increasingly moved into more upscale tourist and residential areas.

Travelers should take appropriate precautions, and they should avoid walking alone after dark or in isolated areas and avoid placing themselves in positions where they are alone with strangers. They should be cautious on deserted areas of beaches at all hours. Hotel guests should always lock their doors and should never leave valuables unattended, especially on beaches. Visitors should store passport/identity documents, airline tickets, credit cards, and extra cash in hotel safes, and they should avoid wearing expensive jewelry, particularly Rolex watches, which have been targeted increasingly by criminals. Please use only clearly marked taxis and make a note of the license plate number for your records.

The loss or theft of a U.S. passport overseas should be reported to the local police and the nearest U.S. embassy or consulate. A lost or stolen U.S. birth certificate and/or driver’s license generally cannot be replaced outside the United States. U.S. citizens may refer to the Department of State’s pamphlets, A Safe Trip Abroad and Tips for Travelers to the Caribbean, for ways to promote a more trouble free journey. The pamphlets are available by mail from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington DC 20402, via the Internet at http://www.access.gpo.gov/su_docs, or via the Bureau of Consular Affairs home page at http://travel.state.gov.

9.What vaccinations should you take prior to entering this country?

MEDICAL FACILITIES: Medical care is generally good in Nassau and Freeport, but it is limited in other areas. Serious health problems requiring hospitalization and/or medical evacuation to the United States can cost thousands of dollars. Doctors and hospitals usually expect immediate cash payment for health services. Persons with serious or life-threatening conditions normally must be airlifted to hospitals in the United States for treatment.

There is a chronic shortage of blood at Princess Margaret Hospital in Nassau, where most emergency surgery is performed. Travelers with rare blood types should know the names and locations of possible blood donors should the need arise.

OTHER HEALTH INFORMATION: Information on vaccinations and other health precautions, such as safe food and water precautions and insect bite protection, may be obtained from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s hotline for international travelers at 1-877-FYI-TRIP (1-877-394-8747); fax 1-888-CDC-FAXX (1-888-232-3299), or via CDC’s Internet site at http://www.cdc.gov/travel. For information about outbreaks of infectious diseases abroad consult the World Health Organization’s website at http://www.who.int/en. Further health information for travelers is available at http://www.who.int/ith.

A certificate of yellow fever vaccination may be required for entry into certain areas of these countries if you are arriving from a tropical South American or sub-Saharan African country. For detailed information, see Comprehensive Yellow Fever Vaccination Requirements.

CDC recommends the following vaccines (as appropriate for age):

See your doctor at least 4–6 weeks before your trip to allow time for shots to take effect.

•Hepatitis A or immune globulin (IG) should be considered if travel to areas of questionable sanitation is anticipated.

•Hepatitis B, if you might be exposed to blood (for example, health-care workers) or travelers who have sexual contact with the local population, stay longer than 6 months in Haiti or the Dominican Republic, or might be exposed through medical treatment.

•Rabies, if you might be exposed to wild or domestic animals through your work or recreation.

•Typhoid, particularly if you are visiting developing countries in this region.

•Yellow fever, for travelers going outside urban areas in Trinidad and Tobago.

•As needed, booster doses for tetanus-diphtheria and measles. Hepatitis B vaccine is now recommended for all infants and for children ages 11–12 years who did not receive the series as infants.

10.Briefly discuss any other pertinent information regarding this country.

TRAFFIC SAFETY AND ROAD CONDITIONS: While in a foreign country, U.S. citizens may encounter road conditions that differ significantly from those in the U.S. The information below concerning The Bahamas is provided for general reference only, and it may not be totally accurate in a particular location or circumstance.

Safety of Public Transportation: Good

Urban Road Conditions/Maintenance: Good

Rural Road Conditions/Maintenance: Fair

Availability of Roadside Assistance: Fair

Unlike in the United States, traffic on all islands in The Bahamas moves on the left side of the roadway. Road conditions throughout Nassau and Freeport are generally adequate, but drivers should be alert for construction zones, which are not always properly marked. Road travel in other parts of The Bahamas is limited. Some rural roads are narrow, winding, and in poor repair.

Tourists should exercise caution if renting motorbikes for transportation during their visit. Severe, and sometimes fatal, accidents with motorbikes have involved American tourists. Travel by moped or bicycle is very hazardous, especially in the heavy traffic conditions prevalent in Nassau and Freeport, and visitors should carefully consider whether such travel is worth the risk of a serious accident. Those who choose to ride a moped or bicycle should wear helmets and drive defensively. Pedestrians also should be aware when stepping off curbs that vehicular traffic comes from the right. Death and serious injuries have occurred when visitors have failed to adapt to unfamiliar rules of the road.

For specific information concerning driver’s permits, vehicle inspection, road tax, and mandatory insurance in The Bahamas, please contact the Bahamas Tourist Board in New York at telephone (212)758-2777.

3.Compose a request for a landing permit, or if that is not allowed, an overflight permits.

LANDING PERMISION GRANTED FOR BUTLER INDUSTRIES-N9866L

ETA MYAF 7.01.1000Z / ETD MYAF 7.10.0800Z WITH PERMIT

QU PAOYRXH BAHAMAS LANDING REQUEST

RESPECTFULLY REQUEST PERMISSION ON BEHALF OF BUTLER INDUSTRIES, 5181 SUMAC RIDGE DR, YORBA LINDA, CALIFORNIA 92886 USA TO LAND CONGO TOWN/BAHAMAS ON A PRIVATE, NON-COMMERCIAL FLIGHT OPERATING ACFT TYPE C414 REG N9866L

CAPTAIN J. BUTLER PLUS 2 CREW AND 3 PAX

1.CAPT. J. BUTLER-11/17/1980-PP#565798426

2.CONTACT: MR. J. BLANCHARD-BAHAMAS AVIATION COUNCIL

PLEASE KNOWLEDGE RECEIPT OF THIS MESSAGE AND CONFRIM LANDING PERMISSION TO KFULMYAF.

JEPPESEN DATAPLAN/INTERNATIOANAL FLIGHT SERVICES

Bibliography:

BIBLIOGRAPHY

1.Global Navigation for Pilots 2nd Edition, Dale De Remer ©1993-1998 pg. 109

2.Garmin Company Logo, http://www.garmin.com. ©2003

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