journal of Personality and Social Psychology,

journal of Personality and Social Psychology,

2

Research Paper Title

Course Title

Semester and Year

Your Name

DIVISIONS OF YOUR PAPER

  1. Page “0” Cover page
  2. Number your pages starting with “1” and the “1” is the first page of your text
  3. On Page 1 or your paper Start with the Introduction
  4. Continue with Page 1 with your first paragraph
  5. Continue with pages two, three, four, five, which will have the remaining information of your paper
  6. Divide your paper into separate paragraphs with separate paragraph titles
  7. Have at least three main paragraphs
  8. You may have more than three main paragraphs, but not less than three
  9. Your last paragraph should be your conclusion
  10. Your sixth page (or last page if longer than 5 pages) will be your Works Cited page
  11. All quotations from your Journal articles must be in APA format.
  12. All Journal articles must be entered as Journal Articles sources in Manage Sources
  13. Number your Pages in the Upper right corner
  14. NO RUNNING HEADER. A running header is your name and the page number

YOU MUST HAVE:

  1. Have at least FIVE (5) JOURNAL ARTICLES for each paper
  2. You may have additional resources, but the minimum is FIVE journal articles
  3. Your journals may be obtained from the internet or from a library
  4. Use paragraph titles such as those indicated in the Example Paper.
  5. Your titles should describe the paragraphs you wrote.
  6. Your research paper topic MUST BE DIFFERENT than your power point topic
  7. Sample of a works cited page (in APA format) is provided below
  8. As this is an opinion research paper, you may agree or disagree with your research findings.
  9. 1-inch margins
  10. Times New Roman font
  11. 12 Pitch
  12. Double Spaced
  13. FIVE FULL PAGES MINIMUM
  14. YOUR FIVE PAGES DOES NOT INCLUDE THE COVER PAGE AND DOES NOT INCLUDING THE WORKS CITED PAGE

EXAMPLE PAPER

INTRODUCTION

The purpose of this study was to develop a model syllabus template for use in community college criminal justice programs. Additionally, the model syllabus proposes a framework upon which an ethics course in criminal justice could be constructed.

INSERT YOUR PARAGRAPH TITLE HERE

Syllabi were collected from criminology instructors who teach criminal justice ethics courses at Higher Learning Commission (HLC) accredited community colleges. Key components of these criminology syllabi were reviewed for common words, phrases, and concepts for incorporation into the model syllabus template. The initial step was the development of a rubric, based on a grounded theory, open coding research tool. The open coding rubric was based on the development and labeling of words, phrases, and conceptual ideologies from gathered syllabi. The rubric content was gleaned from multiple texts and website samples. As syllabi were received, a review process to include common words, phrases, and concepts took place, examining the content for each rubric component. Once this information was identified, it was documented, and the findings coded according to the developed rubric.

INSERT YOUR PARAGRAPH TITLE HERE

The words, phrases, and concepts identified were specific to the categories considered in the rubric and necessary for the accurate development of a model syllabus template. The intent of the rubric was to identify both objective categories and subjective learning outcomes. After the model syllabus template was completed, a panel of experts were asked to review the model syllabus and provided recommendations, which were then integrated into the final model syllabus product. After the initial recommendations were returned from the participating experts, the results were consolidated into the model template and adjustments were made. The updated model was returned one additional time to the experts for any follow-up recommendations. The learning-centered approach used in the syllabus template creation was explicitly apparent within the collected syllabi, regardless of the scaffolding procedures used to attain individual learning outcomes.

INSERT YOUR PARAGRAPH TITLE HERE

The results included 64 syllabi requested from 70 community colleges within the H LC that were identified as having criminal justice programs and curricula that included an ethics course. Three attempts were made for each of the 70 community colleges to obtain ethics syllabi. Sixty-four syllabi, or 91%, were obtained for analysis. During the analysis of each syllabus, several areas of concern were noted. First, less than 10% of the return syllabi included instructor, web contact information, which seemed unusual given the technology in today’s society. Second, one area of notice, embedded within the evaluation and grading criteria in collected syllabi, was the lack of indicated methods of evaluation and grade breakdown at the midterm point. Only 3% of the returned syllabi included a grading scale for midterm grade analysis. This item seems critical for student progress tracking. Third, only 3% of the return syllabi included information concerning rubrics for presentations, even though 27% of group activities included some type of individual or group presentations.

CONCLUSION

The implications of this study brought several things to light. First, of the 172 community colleges offering criminal justice degree programs, within the H LC, only 70 required an ethics course as part of their criminal justice curricula. Second, considering the nature and abundance of corruption within the criminal justice system, it would appear that the number of ethics classes incorporated into criminal justice program curricula is inadequate. Third, minimal guidance concerning student progress at the midterm evaluation point leaves each student the responsibility to assess his or her own progress. This lack of midterm guidance the appearance that faculty regards a midterm evaluation of student progress either insignificant. Fourth, this study included ethics courses offered in criminal justice curricula with both philosophy and criminal justice prefixes. Regardless of the ethics course prefix, classes must rigorously address the origin, depth, and relationship of ethical decisions to relevant paradoxes in criminal justice.

WORKS CITED EXAMPLES

JOURNAL ARTICLES

Wegener, D. T., & Petty, R. E. (1994). Mood management across affective states: The hedonic contingency hypothesis. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 66, 1034-1048.

Kernis, M. H., Cornell, D. P., Sun, C. R., Berry, A., Harlow, T., & Bach, J. S. (1993). There’s more to self-esteem than whether it is high or low: The importance of stability of self-esteem. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 65, 1190-1204.

Wegener, D. T., Petty, R. E., & Klein, D. J. (1994). Effects of mood on high elaboration attitude change: The mediating role of likelihood judgments. European Journal of Social Psychology, 24, 25-43.

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